Modelling African Quaternary Climate and Vegetation Change

Claussen

Prof_Claussen_6519p_01

Prof. Martin Claussen
Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology, University of Hamburg, KlimaCampus Hamburg

Pronounced changes in African climate, deserts and tropical rain forest over the last glacial cycles presumably affected human’s way out of Africa. These changes were induced by large changes in ice masses, ocean circulation and monsoon dynamics which, in turn, were triggered by variations in the Earth orbit around the sun and subsequent alteration of meridional insolation gradients.

Continue reading

IRTG Alumni Doerte Weig dances her PhD!

Moving choices

Dance your phd

Running for the 6th consecutive year, “Dance your Ph.D.” is a Science sponsored contest that challenges scientists to present the outcome of their doctoral research by means of dancing. In other words, contestants are urged to use their bodies “to convey the essence of scientific research”.

Continue reading

Opening IRTG-Colloquium

Welcome IRTG-01
The inaugural IRTG Colloquium for the second funding period of the CRC806 will take place on Monday the 4th of November at 17:30 at Übungsraum 3 (Geographie/Südbau).

Where ostracods meet the Romans

Human impact, climatic events and palaeoenvironments during the Late Holocene

Trajans harbour

Dr. Ilaria Mazzini

Dr. Ilaria Mazzini

I am a palaeobiologist analysing sediments as environmental and climate archives. My research mainly concerns the study of ostracod shells, which can provide information on parameters such as salinity, water depth and presence of macrophytes; stable oxygen and carbon isotopes and trace element ratios of ostracod shells serve as additional proxies of environmental change.

Continue reading

Schistosomiasis – a health risk for travelers

Schistosomiasis_risk_map-01

Dr. med. Burkhard Rieke Facharzt für Innere Medizin, Tropenmedizin

Dr. med. Burkhard Rieke
Facharzt für Innere Medizin, Tropenmedizin

In the first CRC Lecture of the winter term 2013/14, Dr. med. Burkhard Rieke will speak about schistosomiasis (Bilharzia), a parasitic disease commonly found in Africa. Freshwater snails are the vectors (intermediary agents) of the parasitic trematodes (Schistosoma sp.), which can infect humans exposed to contaminated water. Several CRC projects are running in Africa and their project members are often exposed to water that might be contaminated by infected freshwater snails.

Continue reading