The Motivation for the Seasonal Movement of Bison Hunters on the Northwestern Plains of North America

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Gerald Oetelaar

Prof. Gerald A. Oetelaar, Department of Archaeology, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada

To western researchers, the structure of the grasslands ecosystem on the Northwestern Plains of North America is determined primarily by climate as modified locally by topography, drainage, and sediments. The seasonal availability of the different grasses determines the migratory behaviour of bison which, in turn, influences the movement of human populations. Bison ecology and behaviour also determine the patterns of human aggregation and dispersal. Long-term climatic fluctuations, as measured by effective moisture and temperature, influence the net primary productivity of the short grass plains and, by extension, the size of the bison population.

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Introduction to GIS

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Instructor: Dr. Andreas Bolten (Project Z2)

Dr. Andreas Bolten

Dr. Andreas Bolten, Institute of Geography, University of Cologne

Every geographical dataset is a combination of location and attribute data. However, the location can be understood as one individual attribute of a dataset. Different data formats or data models are available to optimize data storage and/or analyze speed.

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Models on adaptive strategies of hunter-gatherers derived from the analysis of lithic tools

Schmidt_Banner_nConcepts and methods applied to Solutrean points from Iberia

 Isabell Schmidt Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, African Archaeology, University of Cologne, Germany

Dr. des. Isabell Schmidt
Institute of Prehistoric Archaeology, African Archaeology, University of Cologne, Germany

Archaeological research has developed numerous approaches to trace past human behaviour and its ability to adapt to different or changing environmental and social conditions. Although differences and changes are generally perceived on very broad temporal and spatial scales in prehistory, methods applied to archaeological remains frequently operate on local, momentary scales.

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